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Levels of Intensive ESL

  • advisor reviewing course requirements with student

The Intensive English Program (IEP) has six levels from beginning to high-intermediate. In addition, advanced students who want to stay in the ACLI may take Specialty Courses that will meet the requirements of those with F-1 visas.

ESLA 1970 AND ESLA 1980

Students who have not studied much English enroll in ESLA 1970 and ESLA 1980. They improve their listening, speaking, reading, vocabulary and writing in these two classes.

Students entering ESLA 1970 and ESLA 1980 may be able to comprehend very short simplified texts that are written for ESL students at the beginning level. They may be able to identify some details and recognize vocabulary in short, simplified stories. They may know the English alphabet, but have difficulty writing or write slowly. They know some basic vocabulary and use it to communicate simple ideas. They may be able to understand simple oral commands and basic questions about personal information with repetition.

In ESLA 1970 and ESLA 1980:

  • Students read simplified materials that have been produced for ESL students at their level. They identify important ideas from short readings in order to increase vocabulary and develop reading skills.
  • They practice the alphabet and write words and basic sentences about personal information.
  • They listen to simplified passages and develop listening skills for social situations. They practice identifying main ideas in listening passages.
  • They participate in class and group discussions on topics of personal interest and everyday life.
ESLA 1971 AND ESLA 1981

Students who already know some English enroll in ESLA 1971 and ESLA 1981. They improve their listening, speaking, reading, vocabulary and writing, and they learn some basic English grammar skills.

Students entering ESLA 1971 and ESLA 1981 should be able to comprehend simplified texts that are written for ESL students at the beginning level. They are able to identify the main idea and some details and recognize some vocabulary in such readings. Students know the English alphabet and can write a few basic sentences about simple and familiar subjects. They use basic vocabulary to communicate ideas about personal information and everyday life. They have basic listening skills and can identify and recall facts presented orally as long as the information is presented slowly and clearly and repeated if necessary. They are usually able to respond to simple questions about personal information.

In ESLA 1971 and ESLA 1981:

  • Students read simplified materials that have been produced for ESL students at their level. They identify main ideas and some details from the readings.
  • They practice writing basic sentences about simple and familiar subjects. They practice basic punctuation use and subject-verb agreement for the simple present and past tenses. Editing skills are introduced at the sentence level.
  • They listen to simplified passages and develop listening skills for social situations. They identify main ideas in listening passages.
  • They participate in class and group discussions on topics of personal interest and everyday life. They sometimes speak to their classmates on prepared topics.
ESLA 1972 AND ESLA 1982

Students who have studied some English enroll in ESLA 1972 and ESLA 1982. They continue to gain fluency and language control in these two classes. They improve their listening, speaking, reading, vocabulary and writing, and they learn basic English grammar skills.

Students entering ESLA 1972 and ESLA 1982 can usually read simplified stories and articles that are written for ESL students at the beginning level. They are able to identify the main idea and some details and recognize common vocabulary in such texts. Students demonstrate an ability to write several sentences using simple tenses about a familiar topic. They use basic vocabulary and simple sentences to converse about everyday life. They have basic listening skills and are able to understand simple questions and passages at a beginning level.

In ESLA 1972 and ESLA 1982:

  • Students read simplified and some authentic materials including stories and articles. They identify and restate the important ideas from short readings and write compositions in order to develop reading skills and critical thinking.
  • They write multiple drafts of simple paragraphs and practice revising and editing skills.
  • They listen to simplified passages and develop listening skills for social situations. They practice rephrasing main ideas about the listening passage.
  • They participate in class and group discussions on topics of personal interest. They give short presentations on prepared topics.
ESLA 1973 AND ESLA 1983

Students who have studied some English enroll in ESLA 1973 and ESLA 1983. These students usually feel comfortable communicating in speaking and writing. They begin to use English for academic purposes in these classes, continuing to build fluency and control.

Students entering ESLA 1973 and ESLA 1983 can usually read fictional and nonfictional texts, including simplified academic texts that are written specifically for ESL students and other simple narratives. They are able to identify the main idea and some support of an article or story and begin to restate those ideas in their own words. They recognize many common vocabulary words in their reading. Students demonstrate an ability to write several sentences in paragraph form about a familiar topic. They use basic vocabulary within simple and compound sentences to discuss topics of personal interest. They have basic listening skills and are able to understand most directions given orally.

In ESLA 1973 and ESLA 1983:

  • Students read simplified and authentic materials including articles and novels. They summarize short readings and write other compositions in order to develop reading skills and critical thinking.
  • They write multiple drafts of paragraphs and practice revising and editing skills.
  • They listen to simplified news stories and other material and demonstrate general comprehension of the main idea. They practice rephrasing main ideas and asking questions about what they have heard.
  • They participate in class and group discussions on social topics and news events. They give presentations on prepared topics.
ESLA 1974 AND ESLA 1984

Students who have studied English for several years enroll in ESLA 1974 and ESLA 1984. These students usually feel comfortable and confident with their English skills and are ready to learn about the academic demands of American higher education. Students use English for academic purposes in these classes, continuing to increase fluency and control of both written and spoken English.

Students entering ESLA 1974 and ESLA 1984 are expected to be able to read fictional and nonfictional texts, including simple academic texts and narratives. They use materials that are written for ESL students as well as authentic readings. They are able to identify the main idea and major support of an article or story and begin to paraphrase those ideas. Students demonstrate an ability to write a paragraph with a topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence. They are beginning to use intermediate vocabulary within simple and compound sentences to discuss familiar topics and rephrase ideas from a simplified listening passage.

In ESLA 1974 and ESLA 1984:

  • Students read simplified and authentic materials including articles and unabridged novels. They write summaries and other compositions in order to develop reading skills and critical thinking.
  • They write multiple drafts of well-developed paragraphs and practice revising and editing skills.
  • They listen to news stories, interviews and lectures. They practice rephrasing main ideas, asking appropriate questions and taking notes.
  • They participate in class and group discussions. They give presentations, begin to argue persuasively and answer questions on a given topic.
ESLA 1975 AND ESLA 1985

Students who have studied English for several years enroll in ESLA 1975 and ESLA 1985. These students usually feel comfortable and confident with their English skills and are ready to learn about the academic demands of American higher education. Students use English for academic purposes in these classes, continuing to increase fluency and control of both written and spoken English.

Students entering ESLA 1975 and ESLA 1985 are expected to be able to read fictional and nonfictional texts, including simple academic texts and narratives. They are able to identify the main idea and major support of an article or story and paraphrase those ideas. Students demonstrate an ability to write a well-developed paragraph or short composition with a main idea sentence and strong support to make a sufficient argument. They are able to use intermediate vocabulary and complex sentences to discuss familiar topics and rephrase ideas from a listening passage.

In ESLA 1975 and ESLA 1985:

  • Students read both simplified and authentic materials including articles and unabridged novels. They write summaries and other compositions in order to develop reading skills and critical thinking.
  • They write multiple drafts of compositions with well-developed paragraphs and practice revising and editing skills.
  • They listen to news stories, interviews, and lectures. They practice rephrasing main ideas, asking appropriate questions and taking notes.
  • They participate in class and group discussions. They learn about making academic presentations. They give presentations, argue persuasively and answer questions on a given topic.
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