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'There', 'Their', 'They're' AND 'Its', 'It's', 'Its''


'There' can be used to indicate a place or direction:

Let's go over there.
Have you ever been there?
A nice man lives there.

'There' can also act as the meaningless subject of a sentence:

There are thirteen stripes on the American flag.
There is no cure for the common cold.

'Their' is the possessive form of "they."

They own this car. This is their car. This car is theirs.
Where is their car? It is over there.

They're is a contraction which always means "they are."

They're leaving for the restaurant at six o'clock.
They're bringing their three children, and they're expecting us to meet them.

Note: Avoid using contractions such as this in formal writing.

 

We will meet them there. We can look for their car outside of the restaurant when we get there.

 

See?  'It's not too bad.   Speaking of 'its', let's talk about the uses of its, it's, and its'.


'Its
' is the possessive form of "it."

The dog whimpered because its bowl was empty.
New York is an exciting city, but its streets are too crowded for me.
The antique table was quite valuable, but then someone broke its leg.

 

'It's' is a contraction which always means "it is."

It's too hot to go outside.
New York is an exciting city, but it's too crowded for me.
It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas.

Note: Avoid using contractions is formal writing.

Its' does not exist.

 

 

 

 

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