Sunday, November 15, 2009

Slumped pizza

slumped pizza

This pizza-ite clearly passed into the brittle-ductile transition while it was vertically-oriented. This event translated coherent ingredients downward, presumably along less competent flowing cheese/dough/slush surfaces. High-contrast olives serve as good marker units for detecting the overall kinematics: note their greater concentration at the paleo-bottom of the pie (also bottom of this photo). It is inferred that these olives were originally dispersed across the face of the pizza-ite at approximately equal distances. The overall pie has strained from an original circular shape to an elliptical one, and detached from the basement cardboard along a major fault. The "top" of the pizza-ite may therefore be regarded as an overall extensional regime, while the "base" of the pie is compressional. The highest-pressure zone at the base appears to have metamorphosed up some new substances, including an ice/cheese amalgam (darker yellow).

Subsequent to this photograph being captured, the pizza experienced a high-temperature, low-pressure event which has been theoretically located to the second rack of my oven, and then was broken into eight ~equal area terranes separated along a radial series of fractures. An episode of physical weathering pulverized the pizza-ite, followed by chemical disaggregation in a low-pH medium. The energy released by this process was sufficient to power the typing of keys on a keyboard, and ultimately generated a new entity: a blog post. Through the twin miracles of digital technology and structural interpretation, we can work out that the protolith of the blog post was the deformed pizza. Careful dating of this blog post reveals it passed through closure status at 7:45am on November 15, 2009.

Labels: , , ,

3 Comments:

Blogger A Life Long Scholar said...

I like this post, thank you.

November 15, 2009 8:14 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

It seems unlikely that the olives were originally distributed evenly as is postulated. The olives stuck to pepperoni slices show that they don't move much relative to the cheese.

My 3 years slinging dough implies different hypothesis. The cardboard implies not-homemade, and this looks like a handful or two of olives tossed on the pizza (by hand or by machine), not carefully and evenly laid.

November 15, 2009 12:26 PM  
Blogger Lockwood said...

Phrases that come to mind are "penecontemporaneous deformation," and "pretty chewed up." Guess which one of the words in the previous sentence the spell checker doesn't recognize?"

November 15, 2009 1:16 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home