Revised 8/96

NVCC COLLEGE-WIDE COURSE CONTENT SUMMARY
JPN 102 - BEGINNING JAPANESE II (5 CR.)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Develops the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese, and emphasizes the structure of the language. Lecture 5 hours per week.

GENERAL COURSE PURPOSE

Beginning Japanese, a basic introductory course, places emphasis on the development of proficiency in the following skills: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing. The student will learn to function in the language within a limited context of vocabulary and structures. The course also includes a general introduction to culture.

ENTRY LEVEL COMPETENCY

The prerequisite for this course is JPN 101 - "Beginning Japanese I" or equivalent.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. understand simple spoken Japanese within the limited context presented to beginners
    1. speak simple Japanese with correct pronunciation at normal conversational speed
    1. read the Japanese the student has already learned to comprehend and speak; introduction to reading selections in rearrangements and recombinations of words and expressions already encountered

    2.  
    3. write accurately what the student has learned to understand, say, and read
MAJOR TOPICS TO BE COVERED

The student will learn the structure of the Japanese language in a prescribed sequence beginning with the simplest structures and working toward the more complex. The student will learn correct Japanese pronunciation. Topics and situations to be covered may include:

    1. Personal Identification
    2. Education
    3. House and Home
    4. Earning a Living
    5. Services
    6. Leisure
    7. Family Life
    8. Public and Private Services
    9. Community/Neighborhood
    10. Shopping
    11. Physical Environment
    12. Travel
    13. Meal-taking/Food/Drink
    14. Current Events
    15. Health and Welfare
OPTIONAL TOPICS

Development of the awareness of cultural patters, including social patterns of behavior, historical developments and contributions to the arts and sciences.


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