NVCC COLLEGE-WIDE COURSE CONTENT SUMMARY
PHI 220 - ETHICS (3 CR.)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Provides an systematic study of representative ethical systems.

GENERAL COURSE PURPOSE

To introduce the student to the principal ideas and issues in ethics discussed by philosophers from classical contemporary times. To examine the major ethical systems of normative ethics. To analyze and critically evaluate current moral controversies by the practical application of these theories to specific issues and actual cases.

ENTRY LEVEL REQUIREMENTS

None

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course the student will be able to identify and critically evaluate the major ethical systems. The student will be able to use these theories to analyze contemporary moral issues. Specifically, the student will be able to:

A. Discuss and define relevant concepts, such as "value", "obligation", "good", "evil", "natural law", "virtue", "character", "will", "duty".

B. Identify, evaluate and compare the major ethical systems, including Classical, Natural law, Kantian, Utilitarian, and social contract ethics.

C. Be able to use these theories in the analysis of contemporary moral problems.

D. Understand the role of reason and argument in ethical decision making.

MAJOR ELEMENTS OF CONTENT

The following questions will be examined from the perspectives of the major ethical systems:
 

A. Are all standards of right and wrong conditioned solely by the cultural norms by which one lives? What other alternatives are there?

B. How can we determine what is right for us to do? What are the rules for determining moral rules?

C. What obligations do we have to others? What is the source of those obligations?

D. What has genuine value for the human person? Why do we value what we do?

E. What rights do we have as human beings? What is the basis of our entitlement to those rights?


Revised 10/95


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