NVCC COLLEGE-WIDE COURSE CONTENT SUMMARY
HIS 188 - FIELD SURVEY TECHNIQUES FOR ARCHAEOLOGY (3 CR.)

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Provides an introduction to basic field techniques used in surveying archaeological and architectural sites.  Emphasizes hands-on experience in both classroom and field work.  Includes methods to identify and record archaeological sites and standing structures, to nominate sites to the National Register of Historic Places, to address relevant preservation laws, to preserve, mark, and catalogue artiffacts in the laboratory.   Lecture 3 hours per week.

GENERAL COURSE PURPOSE

This course will provide an introduction to basic field techniques used in surveying archaeological and architectural sites. Hands-on experience will be emphasized in both classroom and field work. Also students will be introduced to the procedures in processing, identifying, analyzing, and conserving artifacts.

ENTRY LEVEL COMPETENCIES

General college entrance competencies.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Upon completion, the student should be able to:

    A. understand the development of cultural resource management in the United States,

    B. know the historic preservation laws and how they are applied in the planning process,

    C. participate in conducting Phase I, II, III archaeological surveys,

    D. complete archaeological survey forms and use basic field equipment,

    E. recognize architectural styles and architectural details,

    F. conduct archival research, and

    G. complete local and national architectural survey forms, including national Register of Historic Places Preliminary Registration Forms.

MAJOR TOPICS TO BE INCLUDED
    A. The Importance of Surveying in Historic Preservation
        1. The role of archaeology and architecture in historic preservation:  A local perspective.
        2. The need to survey: Is the process development driven or a useful planning tool?
        3. Applying Historic Preservation Laws locally, statewide and nationally
    B. Field Methods in Archaeology
       
        1. Where in the World are we? An Introduction to Maps.
        2. Using Topographic Maps in Archaeological Survey.
        3. Preparing the base map: The importance of the transit and grid.
        4. A close encounter with the transit.
    C. Field Methods in Architectural Survey
         
        1. Placing Architectural styles in historic context
        2. The history of Northern Virginia through its buildings.
        3. The finer details of architecture
        4. The national register of historic places:  How to evaluate a property or site.
        5. The national register of historic place:  Completing the preliminary form.
        6. How to complete measured drawings
New 9/97

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