NVCC COLLEGE-WIDE COURSE CONTENT SUMMARY
HIS 111-112 - HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATION (3 CR.) (3CR.)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Surveys Asian, African, Latin American, and European civilizations from the ancient period to the present. The chronological boundaries of HIS 111 are 4,000,000 B.C.E. to 1500 C.E.; those of HIS 112 are 1500 to the present. Lecture 3 hours per week.

GENERAL COURSE PURPOSE

Surveys the world historical processes that produced the first human communities, led to the formation of classical civilizations, and passed through successive eras of regional interactions eventuating in today's global community. At each stage of the process, the "longue duree" is emphasized.

ENTRY-LEVEL COMPETENCIES

No prerequisites. Ability to use the English language effectively at the college-entry level and to read critically texts both primary and secondary is expected.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

1. Help students locate contemporary American life within the context of world historical developments.

2. Develop a working knowledge of the patterns and processes of world history.

3. Offer students opportunities to practice and develop critical thinking skills.

MAJOR TOPICS TO BE COVERED HIS 111 1. The Origins of Human Communities to 500 B.C.E.

2. The Emergence of Classical Cultures and the First Empires in Southwest Asia, the Mediterranean Basin, South Asia, and East Asia (1000 B.C.E.- 500 C.E.)

  3. "The Middle Ages": 300 B.C.E.-1200 C.E. a. Rise and Spread of World Religions (Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam)
b. Spread of Civilization into the Periphery of the Eurasia Oikomene (W. Africa, Northern & Western Europe, and the Americas)
c. Development and Growth of World Trading Networks
 
4. The Mongol Conquest and the End of the "Middle Ages" (1200-1500 C.E.)
MAJOR TOPICS TO BE COVERED HISTORY 112 1. Early Modern Empires, 1350-1750 a. Islamic: Safavi, Mughal, Ottoman and Songhay
b. Confucian: Ming and Qing
c. Russian Empire of Central Asia
d. Regional Interactions between Steppe and Sown in Central Eurasia


2. The Transformation of Europe, 1350-1914: The Three Revolutions

a. The Price & Industrial Revolutions
b. The European Enlightenment (The New Science and Civilization)
c. Political Revolution --State-building and Nation-making in Europe


3. Imperialism Old and New, 1450-1900

a. European Trading Empires in Africa and Asia
b. The Western Intrusion into Africa, Asia, and the Americas
c. Strategies of Resistance among Africans, Arabs, Indians, Chinese, Koreans, Japanese, Native Americans, & Latinos


4. The Twentieth Century: State-building, Nation-making, Warfare, and Modern Economic Growth

a. Modern Economic Growth in World Historical Perspective
b. The Problems of State-building and Nation-making in Asia, Africa, Eastern Eurasia, and the Americas
c.  Industrial Warfare and Its Social and Economic Consequences
d. Wars of National Liberation & Decolonization
e. Global Convergence, Regional Diversity --The Paradox of World History
EXTRA TOPICS MAY BE COVERED

The breadth of the above-cited topics allows (indeed, encourages) individual faculty to make use of their own unique competencies and teaching-styles to shape or reshape course content and to determine its emphasis.

Revised 8/98


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